Unpublished SBM Blog

Recent entries at the Science-Based Medicine Blog.

Click on an entry to read the entire entry.

Exploring issues and controversies in the relationship between science and medicine
  1. Homeopathy claims it works through a variety of mechanisms which, when explored, merely demonstrates just how little homeopaths actually know about science.
  2. Rigorous scientists stabilized a patient’s macular degeneration with a cutting-edge stem cell treatment; less rigorous scientists misapplied stem cell science and left three women blind.
  3. In a forthcoming book The Boy in 7 Billion, Callie Blackwell claims that cannabis oil, which she had started giving her son Deryn to relieve his symptoms during a bone marrow transplant for two cancers, actually saved his life when the bone marrow transplant appeared to be failing. Unfortunately, her story appears to be another testimonial that confuses correlation with causation.
  4. Death from naturopathy. Cows and soldiers have a similar problem. Pseudo-medicines never die. Chiropractic complications. And more.
  5. As an Australian child suffers from tetanus, a horrific and virtually 100% preventable illness, a prominent local anti-vaccine propagandist goes on the attack.
  6. Open thread for topic suggestions, and anything else SBM-related.
  7. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)'s investigation of Manitoba chiropractors reveals widespread antivaccine sentiment. These statement are at odds with medical facts, and critics are questioning why chiropractic remains publicly funded.
  8. A recent CBC News investigation reveals the common pseudoscientific claims and quackery of Manitoba chiropractors.
  9. A recent study attempted to quantify the association of ten dietary factors with deaths from cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Headlines about the study were misleading.
  10. Richard Jaffe, a lawyer who has made a career out of defending quacks like Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski, thinks that the ACCME, the main accrediting body for continuing medical education (CME) credits, is cracking down on "complementary and alternative medicine" CME courses. That would be a very good thing indeed, but is it really happening? More importantly, would it be enough?