OCT
02

Bioenergy and Breast Cancer: More Tooth-Fairy Science Funded by NCCIH

If you can put aside for a moment the fact that innocent lab mice were killed for no good reason and that you, the taxpayer, paid for this travesty , Bioenergy and Breast Cancer: A Report on Tumor Growth and Metastasis offers the reader some real laughs. But before we get to the fun, let's get some technical details out of the way. The re...
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SEP
28

Points of Interest 09/27/2016

J Clin Nurs. 2016 Feb;25(3–4):332–9. doi: 10.1111/jocn.13053. Epub 2015 Nov 27. Effect of auricular acupressure for postpartum insomnia: an uncontrolled clinical trial. Uncontrolled. Why bother? Sci Rep. 2015 Nov 26;5:16776. doi: 10.1038/srep16776. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systema...
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DEC
28
0

Keeping an eye on NCCAM research may become easier if new NIH policy adopted

According to JAMA,  a recent analysis of 400 clinical studies revealed that 30% had not shared results through publication or through results reporting in ClinicalTrials.gov within 4 years of completing the research.  Why? 

The scientific community has a disappointing track record for dissemination of clinical trial results. Numerous factors may contribute to these poor publication rates, including some that are beyond the control of researchers. Despite the best efforts of investigators, the results of some trials may never reach the threshold deemed necessary to merit the attention of journal editors and readers.

A big step forward in clinical trial transparency was made in November when the Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health published proposals requiring researchers to report the results of certain trials at ClinicalTrials.gov.  

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DEC
18
4

A Center By Any Other Name

I was a huge fan of Dragnet as a kid. At the end they always noted that the ‘names were changed to protect the innocent.’ A good policy, protecting the innocent. Not always the result of a name change however.

The NCCAM (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) has a new name and new initials: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH).

The name was changed because people do not use alternative medicine alone, but they integrate useless pseudo-medicines to complement reality-based medicine. And to quote me, when you integrate cow pie with apple pie, the cow pie does not taste better, the apple is worse.

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Recent Comments
Guest — Barbara Wilson
How about Batman and Robin? Double lives, masks, capes, names different? And a dependable plot: Bad guy, Duo to save city, Robin c... Read More
Thursday, 18 December 2014 14:42
Guest — Barbara Wilson
How about Batman and Robin? Double lives, masks, capes, names different? And a dependable plot: Bad guy, Duo to save city, Robin c... Read More
Thursday, 18 December 2014 14:42
Eugenie Mielczarek
Barbara: Very perceptive metaphor . Doubtful news.com also covered this press release today. With some additional history and li... Read More
Thursday, 18 December 2014 22:24
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JUL
06
0

Research shows research doesn't matter

Do the facts matter? 

When Beliefs and Facts Collide, an opinion piece by Brendan Nyhan published over the weekend in the NY Times, thinks not, not when it interferes with identity issues, like religion and politics.  Dismayed scientists have concluded from this that more education is in order. If people just knew the facts! But according to a new study from Yale, cited by Mr. Nyhan, facts don't matter. The study concludes

that the divide over belief in evolution between more and less religious people is wider among people who otherwise show familiarity with math and science, which suggests that the problem isn’t a lack of information. When he instead tested whether respondents knew the theory of evolution, omitting mention of belief, there was virtually no difference between more and less religious people with high scientific familiarity. In other words, religious people knew the science; they just weren’t willing to say that they believed in it. 

According to Mr. Nyhan, this helps explain why he and his colleagues have found that 

factual and scientific evidence is often ineffective at reducing misperceptions . . . .

Tell us about it!  If he thinks it's difficult with issues like health care reform (another stubborn issue he mentions), he should try CAM beliefs. 

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